Why a Nice Lunch Beats Facebook and LinkedIn – Every Time

By Why a Nice Lunch Beats Facebook and LinkedIn – Every Time Holger Reisinger

Emails, LinkedIn, Facebook, and other digital solutions are great for information sharing but are killing innovation, collaboration, and efficiency in modern knowledge-based companies. It’s time to enter the era of meaningful conversation. I just rediscovered an old book that shows us how.
Why a Nice Lunch Beats Facebook and LinkedIn – Every Time

Just the other day I finished re-reading the New York Times bestseller, “Never eat alone,” written by Keith Ferrazzi. The book is basically a cookbook in achieving success by building and utilizing your personal network to get better jobs, more business, new opportunities, or whatever you crave in life.

The concept is simple: if you build a large personal network, the network will, over time, reward you with more opportunities in life. All you need is to plan your targets and execute your plan, and, of course, buy Mr. Ferrazzi’s book.

“Never eat alone” is about your personal success; re-reading the book made me realize that it also holds a hidden gem for the successful companies of the future. Continue reading

The World’s Greatest Auto-Reply Message

By The World’s Greatest Auto-Reply Message Holger Reisinger

How far are you willing to go to tell your coworkers that you need some time to concentrate and get your work done? Check out the automated reply one of my colleagues just began using.

Do not cross

I just received this amazing auto-reply from a colleague I just emailed, and I just had to share it: Continue reading

The 28-Hour Hamster Wheel


By The 28-Hour Hamster Wheel Holger Reisinger

Knowledge workers spend 28 hours a week answering e-mails or looking for information. But research shows that there are better and faster ways of generating your business results. It’s time to dismantle the hamster wheel, stop hiding behind our screens, and start having meaningful conversations instead. 

The 28-Hour Hamster Wheel

My company, just like most others, spends a great deal of time on e-mails. According to the McKinsey Global Institute, the average knowledge worker spends a whopping 28 hours e-mailing, requesting and sending information back and forth. I personally receive well over 200 e-mails a day and often have to spend my evenings answering them all, in order to be able to get my other work done when I’m back in the office.I guess that the lyrics of traditional boy/girl break-up love songs seldom have much to offer in solving today’s management challenges. But just the other day, Cliff Richard’s old hit “We don’t talk anymore” was playing on my car radio, and it got me thinking.

Twenty-eight solid hours! Continue reading